To Tell The Truth – DO Blondes have more FUN?! READ ALL ABOUT IT! | BUZZR

To Tell The Truth – DO Blondes have more FUN?! READ ALL ABOUT IT! | BUZZR


-Ladies and gentlemen, Garry
Moore. -Thank you very much, Bill
Wendell. Hi, everybody. Our first guest on this show
lays claim to being the widest read columnist in the history of American
journalism. I think quite possibly he’s
right. The panel will probably find out
in just a minute, right here on To Tell the Truth. -Bill Cullen, Peggy Cass, Orson Bean, and Kitty Carlisle. -Panel, I got something to
show you here that said, it’s funny all around if you
like old things. This is an issue of The New York
Daily News and it bears the date May 3rd,
1921. You can see royal gems stolen
here. Then, you look on the back here
and it says, “Is Babe’s throne tottering?” -Twenty-one. -These are pictures of people who were possibly threatened. Down here is a comic strip of
Andy Gump. If you look on the inside of it, one of the main features of the
paper is the Inquiring Reporter. -I love that. -Here’s the one, the Inquiring
Reporter. The print is much too small for you to read on the
camera. So, I’ll read the question of
that day. The question was, “Is France justified in seizing the
Ruhr?” So, that dates it for us. Well, the man who asked that question and has been asking questions for more than 50 years now is with us today. Let us meet him immediately. -Number one, what is your
name, please? -My name is Jimmy Jamail. -Number two. -My name is Jimmy Jamail. -Number three. -My name is Jimmy Jamail. -That’s what they all say. Only one of them is telling the
truth. Let’s listen to the journalistic jargon of Jimmy Jamail. He says, “I, Jimmy Jamail, spent 52 years as the inquiring photographer for The New York Daily News. Over the years, I was out in the streets of New York, pad,
pencil, and camera in hand, to ask passersby their opinions and to
immortalize them in print. Since the day when I asked my
first question, I have stopped to talk to, and I have snapped the pictures of half a million people. I just stumbled into this job. The Daily News had hired me as
the Sunday Watchman. But on my first day at work, there was a sudden need for an inquiring reporter and before
I knew it, the job was mine. Since the Daily News has the largest circulation of any
newspaper in the world and my column is among the most popular features, it is estimated that my inquiring photographer column
has been read by approximately 76
billion people.” Signed, Jimmy Jamail. It will be fun
for our panel to inquire of the inquiring photographer
in just a moment, after a couple of commercials. -Okay. Now, the situation is as
follows: We have as our guests, three
gentlemen, all saying that they are Jimmy
Jamail, longtime inquiring photographer for The New York Daily News. The first inquisitor will be Mr.
William Cullen. -Good job of work, Jimmy, you have done too,
whichever one you are. Number one, that issue of the news that Garry showed us in
1921, was that the year you began the Inquiring Photographer? -That’s the year. -Staying with you, number one, are you still active doing it? -No, I retired at the
beginning of the year. -But they still do have the
Inquiring Photographer? -Yes, they have, sir. -But it’s not Jimmy Jamail
anymore? -No, it’s not Jimmy Jamail. -I automatically associate the
two. -Number two. Have you been with the news all the time? Did you start with the Daily News or did you start with- -I started as a watchman. -As a watchman? -That’s right. -At the Daily News? -That’s right. -Then, up to reporter. -Then, gradually I got to
inquiry reporter. -I remember Garry’s reading the statements you made. Were you assigned that or was it your idea for the Inquiring
Photographer? -No, I was assigned to that. -Number three. I know you
probably don’t remember this and I don’t expect you to, but to your
knowledge, have I ever been in there as one
of the people who happened to be
asked a question and had an answer to
it? -Not that I can recollect. -I’m not surprised because my answer probably wasn’t very
memorable anyway. -It takes it to Peggy Cass,
please. -Jack Turkett always promised
me I’d get in the Inquiring Photographer and I
never did, it was my ambition. Now, number three, who is Gerald
Nachman? -I don’t know. -That’s okay. Number one, what kind of a camera do you
use? -What I use now or when I
started? -You changed cameras over the
years? -Yes, sure. In 22 years, I changed the camera. I had to. -But when you first went out, did you have one of those big
cameras? -No, the big one was the
second one. I had somebody take the
pictures. The first time, I had the
Graflex where you look down into it and take
the picture. That I had around my neck. But the second one was that big Graphic, five by seven. -With the tripod? -No. You just held in front of you with the
glass plate. -Mr. Jamail number two, would you station yourself at 34th and 6th Avenue for the
whole day, or would you just walk around
willy-nilly? -Just walk around willy-nilly. -All right. Now, number two,
again, when you ask the people
questions like, “What is the worst thing going on in this country today,” do they give you big long
answers and then you’d edit it down into
a few sentences? -Some do and some don’t. -Thank you, Peggy. Let’s go to
Orson. -Yeah. I’ll never forget a
question and answer thing once I saw in the paper
where someone wrote in and said, “Did the invasion of Hannibal
cause the downfall of the Babylonian
Empire?” The fella says, “It’s beginning
to look that way.” Number three, have times
changed, I mean, in the beginning, if you went up to someone and
wanted to take their picture, they’d be
happy, but lately, do they think maybe you were a weirdo and go running
away? -No, the times never change. People are always the same. -Yeah, are they? Well, number
one, did you find any difference in
the attitudes? Is there any way-
-I found difference. -Yeah. How, what? -I asked one fella, “Do you love your
mother-in-law?” -Yeah. -He said, “You can drop dead with my mother-in-law.” -Number two. What’s some of
the strange answers you ever got, anything weird
like that? -Well, nothing weird, no. -Yeah? Number two, what does vox pop mean to you? -I knew you would ask that. -I wouldn’t know. -Number three, does that mean anything to you, vox pop? -Yeah. It’s the voice of the
people. -Yeah, and where is that used
in connection with the page you appear on? -Well, that’s on the same
page. -Yeah. All right. Number one, what’s the strangest answer you ever got that you could
print? -The strangest answer that I
can print? -Yeah. Anything weird,
memorable? -Well, the strangest answer that I got from somebody, “Would you like to go out with
me?” -That’s funny. Did you go,
number one? You can tell us. -No, you wouldn’t do it? -All right. Kitty Carlisle. -Number three, did the paper
give you the questions to ask or did you dream them up yourself? -At the beginning, it was a combination of both. -Number two, do you find that the questions that you
asked toward the end changed a lot from the ones that you asked in
the beginning? -They had. -In what way? -Well, some people would say to
me, “What do you think of these
days, how you feel about them?” I’d say, “Well, I don’t know. It’s hard to stop some of these
people and ask them questions because
today, you know the conditions.”>>I see. Number one, did you
ever get any turndowns? People who said- -Quite a few. –don’t bother me.” -They said, “I’m too busy.” I said, “Just a sec, let me ask
you.” “Too busy, can’t be bothered.” -Thank you. Number three, how did you pick your
candidates? -By intuition usually, and I look at the, depends upon
the question. A question that requires a good
deal of knowledge, I look very closely for a person’s intellect in his
face. -I see. -There goes that little bell and that cuts off any questions
we had in mind. Now, it’s voting time. You and I will vote mentally for
number one, or for number two, or for number
three. -Each team of challengers,
$50 for each wrong vote. Pay him $500 if we stump the
panel. Bill Cullen starts, please. -Again, I say it was a fun
column and I enjoyed it and will continue
to. Number three, the way he talked
about depending on the question as far as the way the person
looks. I voted for number three for
that reason. -We got a three going there, and disappointed Peggy. -No, I was going to vote for
three, but with all that gray, he looks as though he should be
with Bankers Trust. Now, look at number one, all
that purple, he belongs with the Daily News. -All right. You say you got
one and three is on both ends. Orson, how are you
going? -Yeah. Well, number three knew
about vox pop, which is the head of their letters to the editor,
that’s the title of it. But I still voted for number
one. It could be, it could be either
of them. -All right. So, one’s got two, and what’s Kitty going
to do? -I voted for number three
because he looks as though he’s been outdoors most
of his life. -Well, you’ve got him split on
both ends. Let’s find out. The votes are
in. He’s the guy we’ve all read for
years and years. Now, you’re going to see him in
person. Will the real Jimmy Jamail
please stand up? There you are. Couldn’t speak to you before
Jimmy, because I didn’t want to give
anything away. Nice to see you again, my
friend. -Good to see you again. -Number 1, tell us about
yourself. What is your real name, and what
do you do? -My name is Harrison C.
Wrestler. I’m a wholesale trimming
salesman for New York Trimming Fashion at 370
West, 35th, and I also was a foil as
the bagel king. -No advertising. -One time before he was on this show as an impostor. Panel with
memories like a steel trap. Number 2, you’re charming. What
is your- -Mine is Freddy Weber. -Piano player. -Made first Vitaphone with Al Jolson and Georgie
Jessel, piano player. -Sure. Freddy Weber. Jimmy Jamail, are you enjoying your retirement now or is it
painful? -It’s painful, I have to
admit. After a life of great activity, all around football player and played in the first Rose
Bowl game. Played football, basketball, and round for four years. Interviewed half a million
people, busy every day and now I’m
sitting around doing nothing trying to be
interested. -Just walk around with your
camera and still ask questions. They won’t
know. -(inaudible). -Thank you Jimmy, and thank
you gentlemen very much for being with us on
To Tell The Truth. -Now, let’s meet our physician
psychiatrist. Number 1, what is your name
please? -My name is Dr. Roderic
Gorney. -Number 2. -My name is Dr. Roderic
Gorney. -Number 3. -My name is Dr. Roderic
Gorney. -Here is Dr. Roderic Gorney’s
provocative message. He says, “I, Roderic Gorney, I’m a physician, psychiatrist,
and psychoanalyst. In my book titled The Human
Agenda, I discuss humanity’s future, making it clear that human
beings must learn to live with reality or
perish. They must have human values. I point out for example that the
craze to have blond hair can be a retreat from
reality. In my in-depth study of man’s quest for the blond image, I have found that sometimes
there is little truth to the idea that blondes have more
fun. In fact, Marilyn Monroe billed her movie image on blondeness, only to find that while fulfilling the fantasies of
everyone, she was not able to fulfill her
own reality needs. To sum it up, when a woman turns
herself into a blonde, for many people, she symbolizes a childish
femininity and is likely to find she is expected not to have more fun but to be more fun.” Signed Dr. Roderic Gorney. Let’s start the questioning with
a gentleman up now. We’ll let’s start with Peggy
Cass. I think this should be right
down your alley. -Thank you. You say that a girl must live reality or
perish. But at perish Number 3, if I lived with reality because
how would you go for a Whistler’s Mother white
instead of blonde? Some people are blonde because
they prematurely gray. I mean, have you thought of
that? Not a lot. -Not exactly those terms, but there’s a difference
between reality and what people think reality
is, and that was what I was talking
about in the book. -Well, I understand, but don’t you understand that you would
also, not only would you make a lot of
girls cry at night if they had to stem
paper brown hair, paper bag brown hair, instead of
blonded. They only kind of make
themselves better looking. -Well, one of the ways to be
better looking, and it’s one of the general
points of the book, is to find out what you really
are instead of trying to be
something that you’re not. -But you don’t have to worry
about me because I’ve been through
psychoanalysis. Now Number 1. Thank you. Now number one, do you realize
the damage you do to the national economy? There’s an awful lot of peroxide
in that stuff sold, and if they didn’t sell it anymore what would the people do
for a job? I mean, have pity. Say
something. -I think what his expression
is, his expression is saying, “Ask
something”. -I’ll make that into a
question. -Let’s go on to author? -Besides, my hair is red. Are you are colorblind? -No, I didn’t accuse you of
anything, Peggy. I think you’re cute. -Oh, all right. -I like your legs too. -Okay. -Okay? I guess that gets me
off. All right Orson. -Number 2, you’re a real
psychiatrist? -Yes, I am. -Tell me about Peggy Cass. Just off the top of your head, what could you tell me about
this sweet thing over here? -I don’t think that this is
the right place to do such a thing. -Oh, you’re looking for money? I see. All right. -Actually, we use a sliding
scale for that. -Number 3, I assume that your
book, The Human Agenda and mankind’s need to Live with reality, is only peripherally involved
with blonde hair. That’s one small thing in the
book, isn’t it? -That that is true. -What are some of the other
things you say that mankind must get into
reality with? -Well, basically the society
in which we live is a constantly
changing society. If we learn to live with things
that will not change, then by the time we learn to
live with them, they’ll be different. It’s
adaptation, really. -I see. -Kitty Carlisle, what do you
want to know? -Well, Number 2, do you
believe that the American culture is based on
childish fantasies? -Not only the American
culture, but to a great extent the
culture of the world over. There are childish fantasies and there are fantasies of all types that are involved with the search for youth, the search for more desirability rather than the actual reality. -Thank you. Number 1, what do
you say in your book that we have to buckle down and
be real about, the values that constantly
changing, as Number 3 said? -Whatever the reality happens
to be at the moment, we have to learn to face it. -Number 3, what for instance? Give us a for instance out of
the book. -Well, for instance, if you
learn to live in an elevator building, and the society changes so that
all elevators are no longer in buildings and you’re
equipped only for elevator buildings, you
can’t live anywhere. You have to learn to adapt to the kind of building change
that’s made. -But Number 2, supposing the pollution doesn’t go out of
the air, how can you adapt to live with that? We’ll all be
dead. -Well, you would have to adapt
in situation of that nature either to change the
culture or change what creates the
pollution or to create a system of society living underground or living in
shelters to get away from it. -Thank you. Now you come with a
very important point. -Now, we’re going on to Bill
Cullen. -Number 1, you mentioned that women are retreating from reality when they make themselves blondes and they’re
not. Are there any other things that
women do when they retreat from reality as far as their appearance is
concerned? -Oh yes, there are other
things. There are all kinds of obscuring of reality such as
makeup. -Come on. -You say that’s a retreat from
reality? -Yes, certainly. -Number 3, are there any
things that men do about their appearance to
retreat from reality? -Yes, indeed. They forget their chronological age and try
to appear younger. -Number 2, would you say just
so happens this way. Would you say when a man affects a beard or something like that? No, I didn’t mean it that way. But actually, a beard is not a necessary thing but a man does grow it because he
wants to. For instance, why do you Number
2 have a beard? -I’ve worn a beard since I
was 16 years old. I felt at that time that it did
age me. I was in a type of work at the
time- -Do you still want to be aged,
Number 2? -Aged? Sometimes. I enjoy the
beard. -Now, that you are older than
16, what do you enjoy about the
beard, Number 2? I’m always curious. -I enjoy the reaction it gets
from my women. -Your women? Plural. -Well, definitely. -Oh, you’re really retreating
from reality here, Number 2, I’ll tell you. Speaking in the collective. It is time now for us to vote, for us to mark our ballots. Who
do you think? Is it Number 1, or is it Number
2, or is it Number 3? -Peggy hasn’t yet. But yes, you have made up your
mind. -Oh, I certainly have, right
off the back. -Oh really? You got in nailed? -Yes. -Who do you think? -Well you see Number 1 and
Number 2 we have adapted to change in my
opinion, but now I’m Number 3, I mean,
too much. The beard is just as bad as makeup. Besides, you’re wrong. People should straighten their
teeth and try to look nice and wear false eyelashes if it
makes them feel good. But now, Number 3 would never do
any of those things, see that shirt and tie. -All right. So, you’ve got a
three, and we’re going to Orson,
please. -Number 1 has that enigmatic
look of the psychiatrist who sits there for the whole 50
minutes and says nothing. Week after week go by, and the patient waits, and the
doctor says nothing, and the patient says
nothing, and finally the patient turns around says, “Doc,” and the doctor says, “Yes,” and the patient says, “Do you need a partner?” -I love the position of your
ballot there too, a supine one on the couch. Kitty. -Well, Number 2 either has a
large family of ladies referring to his
women, or he’s no doctor, because doctors don’t refer to
their women. I think it’s Number 3 but I
voted for Number 1, Mr. enigmatic. -So, that’s the way it is. You got the pair it. Ones in one three and what’s Bill
Cullen going to do? -See, I don’t think the fellow
who wrote this book would have written it
if he wore a beard, and if he had written it I think he would do without the beard. But anyway, I voted for Number 3
because he sits there looking like he’s going to be a $60 dollar bill coming any
minute. -Well, there we go. The vote are in and will the
real Dr. Roderic Gorney please stand up,
sir? Number 2, I guess we
out-guessed ourselves. We figured the beard would be a
help, it turned out to be a downfall. What is your real name and what
do you do? -I’m Stan Berkovich. I’m chairman of New York Mensa. -New York Mensa. Can’t do much
better than that. Number 3, sir. -My name is Bob Colladson, and I’m a communications
consultant. -Now, I’d like to emphasize that this is indeed a truly important book and we could only choose one tiny thing out of it
for the game. What is the book about, Dr.
Gorney? Can you tell us briefly is that
possible? -The book is really about how our human species got into the predicament it faces today and how we can get out of
it. -Dr. Gorney, thank you very
much, and thank you gentlemen for being with us on the
program. -The subtitle of this book, The
Human Agenda, is the Evolution of Human Values and Man’s Way to
Survival, which intrigues me because there
are 80 million books out today which pose questions, and very few of them have an
answer. I don’t think that’s fair. This man claims to have an
answer. I have to read it. Thanks very much for being with us, see you
again. -This is Bill Wendell speaking for To Tell The Truth. A Mark Goodson, Bill Todman
production.

2 Comments

  • Nicholas Williams

    September 10, 2019

    Airdate?

    Reply
  • Vicki Hosana shallenberger

    September 10, 2019

    Yay I'm the first 👍

    Reply

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